Article Type:  Original Article

Title:  Identifying water sources, quality of drinking water, implications and prevalence of selected water borne diseases in rural areas of India:  A Community Based Cross-Sectional and Observational Study

 Year: 2021; Volume: 1; Issue: 2; Page No:  24 – 33

Authors:  Senthilvel Vasudevan1 , Priyanka Raj C K2

Affiliations: 1Assistant Professor of Statistics, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. 2Associate Professor, Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, National University of Science and Technology, Sohar, Sultanate of Oman.

 Article Summary: Submitted: 08-July-2021; Revised: 10-August-2021; Accepted: 10-September-2021; Published: 20-September-2021

 Abstract:

Background:  Water is the most common and essential resources on earth and there are no creatures without it in globe. The quality of drinking water is finding out from its physical, chemical and biological characteristics.  In this study, we have to identify water sources, quality of drinking water, its implications and the prevalence of selected water borne disease in the study rural area of South India.

 Materials and Methods:  We have done a Community Based Cross Sectional and Observational Study with two villages namely Villipakkam and Puthirankottai were selected by simple random sampling with a sample of 1517 individuals with a pre-tested and designed questionnaire.

 Results:  In our study, we have surveyed two villages totally 1517 study participants, 797 (52.5%) were females. The prevalence rate of typhoid in our study population was 2.9%. Out of 58 households, 20 (34%) of the households had other GI problems prevalent in the last 3 months. People were affected by Typhoid in the past three months was significantly associated with educational status, occupational status, boiling of drinking water, washing hands before eating, and using pipe water for drinking water with p<0.05.  The mean pH level was found as 7.14 ± 0.43 (6.50 – 7.65). The results of physical analysis of the twenty water samples were satisfactory.

 Conclusion:  From our study findings, we have concluded that half of the households were only used the pipe water for drinking purpose, weren’t consumed chlorinated water, didn’t drink hot water and didn’t have latrine facilities and awareness is needed to the community.

Keywords: water quality, prevalence, rural population, water quality, water borne diseases, community-based study

 Source of funding:  We didn’t get any kind of funding from the parent institution or any other financial institutions or organizations.  We didn’t give any incentives to the study participants.

Conflict of interest:  The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Corresponding Author:  

Dr. Senthilvel Vasudevan,

Assistant Professor of Statistics,

Department of Pharmacy Practice,

College of Pharmacy,

King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences,

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Email ID: vasudevans@ksau-hs.edu.sa

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